Diaspora of Black Women

The Atlantic Slave Trade which began in 1440 and ended in 1870 is responsible for the scattering of language, culture, and origin of black women in America.

The Atlantic Slave Trade which began in 1440 and ended in 1870 is responsible for the scattering of language, culture, and origin of black women in America.

The brutal and forced enslavement of over 13 million Africans for labor in America is viewed as one of the worst injustices to humans. Women suffered an even bigger violation as they were raped by slave Masters, and forced to have more babies to be sold into slavery.
The struggle continued even after slavery was abolished in America. The introduction of Jim Crow Laws in the South created a larger hostile environment for Black women to succeed in America. They wanted what they had seen white people enjoy which was the right to vote. Also they wanted to have Schools, and Churches to attend. In addition, they wanted legal marriages, judicial equity, and the chance not only to work on their own plots of land, but to keep the rewards of their labor.
Today Black women in America continue to persevere through the struggles of life. A common goal for all Black women is to fight against the forces that would try to marginalize or limit the skills and abilities that are capable of being successful.
What defines Black women is the strength and ability to survive through the worst circumstances in life, and still remain beautiful. The Diaspora of Black Women connects the links of a chain that circles the world.
Queen